Archive for the Category iOS

 
 

Draak Update

Below is gameplay video of a prototype of the puzzle game “Draak” that I am working on. Draak will be an iPad-only iOS game; the prototype below is written to Windows in C# on top of MonoGame.

The initial idea for this game was about the art. I thought it would be cool to make a game that looks like an animated version of one of M. C. Escher’s tessellations, particularly one that involves a similarity symmetry. So I lifted mechanics from a 1990s era game that I always felt was a good game trapped in the typical square lattice for which it was particularly ill-suited. The old game’s Euclidean lay-out wasted a lot of space.

A lot of the work in the above may not be immediately apparent (which is good I think). Specifically, there are actually two shapes of butterflies in the above not just one. They look like this:
draak butterfly tiles
and are arrayed as in a checkerboard with a 90 degree rotation applied to cells of opposite parity — the geometry might be clearer here in which I create these butterfly tiles unadorned with my tool EscherDraw (before I had beziers working in EscherDraw) Thus any time a butterfly moves to a cell with opposite parity I need to not only handle the scale and rotation tweening imposed by the spiral lattice, I also have to simulatenously do the 90 degree rotation imposed by the butterfly tiles and simultaneously morph the actual sprites above from one to the other.

I created the above sprites as vector art using tile outlines exported from Escher draw as SVG and wrote a Python script that morphs SVG as the publically available software for morphing vector graphics is surprisingly non-existent. I am going to post about my vector morphing code here soon, I just need to clean it up for use by people other than me.

What I am working on…

I’m working on a puzzle game for iPads that takes the mechanics of a somewhat obscure game from the 1990s(*) and puts them on a double logarithmic spiral.

The final app will be styled similar to one of M. C. Escher’s tessellations of the plane with the tessellation changing at level breaks. I don’t have a name yet…

Gameplay will be like the following, which is video of a prototype I wrote in C# (just WinForms to the GDI, nothing fancy). I’m going to write the real thing in Swift using Sprite Kit, unless Swift turns out to be too immature in which case I’ll use C++ and Cocos2d-x again.

*: The identity of which I leave as an exercise for the reader.

Cocos2d-x + Box2d Breakout Updated

Cocos2d-x releases since version 3 have broken compatibility with old tutorials. This can especially be a problem when you want to do something slightly non-standard from the point-of-view of Cocos2d-x.

If you want to use physics in a Cocos2d-x game the current standard way to do this is to use the integrated physics classes, which are Chipmunk-based by default and can use Box2d too in some hybrid way the details of which are not at all clear. However,  in my case I want to use Box2d, period, Box2d in a non-integrated manner for transparency and in order to leverage the vast amount of code that you get to peruse and possibly use by writing to vanilla Box2d. When doing something like this it can be hard to know where to start given that any sample code you find will be broken.

For setting up a Box2d/Cocos2d-x project there was always this BreakOut implementation to Cocos2d-iphone by Ray Wenderlich, link, which is transliterated into Cocos2d-x here but to relatively ancient versions of both Box2D and Cocos2d-x. I’ve taken that code and updated it to Cocos2d-x version 3.2 and Box2d version 2.3.

Here is my updated version.

To use do the following:

  1. Setup a cocos2d-x v3.2 project via the python script. This will give you Box2d v2.3 set up in your project without you having to do anything else.
  2. Copy the source code in the above zip file into your project’s Classes directory.
  3. Copy the image files the Ball.jpg, Block.jpg, and Paddle.jpg from here into your project’s Resources directory.
  4. Build.

(You can copy over the music/sound files too. I have the relevant calls commented out in the code above)

Zzazzy 1.0.0

My iPad game Zzazzy has made it through the review process and is now on the App Store: see here.

So that took a little longer than I had intended …

I will be updating the page I have for it here this week with more detailed instructions than what the app itself provides (There is a tutorial mode but it really just covers the basics), but basically it is an action puzzle game in which you lay tiles on a board to form interlocking words, but you’re building words against the clock where

  • forming large grids of words puts time back on the clock
  • not using tiles eventually leads to tile death which takes time off the clock.

It’s a continuous play type of game, like Tetris or something, but with a completely new game mechanic.

New Zzazzy screenshot

Here is what the game is looking like currently (click for fullscreen):
screenshot

Syzygy Update

So, looking at the early entries of this blog, I must have started working on Syzygy around the beginning of the year 2012 because by March 2012 I had the Win32 prototype done. At that time, I didn’t own a Macintosh, didn’t own an iOS device, had never heard of cocos2d-x, and, professionally-wise, was still writing image processing code for Charles River Labs / SPC. Since then SPC was killed, and I moved from Seattle to Los Angeles … but anyway as of today, about a year later, I have the primary functionality of Syzygy running on my iPad, re-using the source code, mostly, from that prototype. I haven’t really been working on it the whole time — there was a lot of moving-to-California in there somewhere, but here’s a screenshot (click for full-size):

There’s a common question in the mobile games forum of gamedev.net, “How can I make a game for iOS only using Windows?”. The answer to this is either (1) you can’t or (2) write your game to Marmalade or cocos2d-x on Windows and then when you are done get a friend with a Mac to let you register as an Apple developer, build under Xcode, and submit to the App store. I always say (1) is the serious answer and if you are unserious, or want to develop a really simple game, then go with (2). Basically I say this because you need to run your game on a device frequently and early, and I’m seeing the truth to this now.

Now that I have Syzygy running on a device I’m seeing issues with input which are artifacts of running on an iPad. The prototype implemented mouse input as a stand-in for touch input. It turns out touch screens and mice aren’t the same thing. The game plays on the device, but when you drag tiles your finger is in the way of the tile visually. You can’t see the tile you are dragging — this seems like it wouldn’t be a big deal, but it kind of is. … This sort of thing is the reason, in my opinion, that if you are not testing on a device during primary development then you are not really serious…

So not sure what I’m going to do about this, I’m thinking of making the tile the user is dragging larger and offset to the upper-left while the user is dragging it. The problem with this is to make it look nice I’d have to have large versions of all the relevant art and some of it I don’t even really remember how I rendered in the first place…

The Cocos2d-x Device Orientation Bug…

This took me all morning to figure out. I’m posting here so there is clear information on this subject in at least one place on the internet.

The situation is this: when targeting iOS6 using Cocos2d-x v2.0.2, there is a bug in the auto-generated “Hello, World” code that shows up in a fresh project such that the compiled game will not display in landscape orientation even after following the steps in this item from Cocos2d-x documentation (such that it exists).

The solution is to follow the steps enumerated in this note from Walzer Wang. This fix is probably already in v2.1 but 2.1 is still beta, as far as I know, so this issue is probably still in a lot of code out there…